Rule #9

20 10 2011

Create art that sells products.

The way to create income in the art licensing business is to create art that sells products. Remember that manufacturers have a business to run. They have products they are producing, and not everyone wants it in one size, shape, design, or color. Oh, we are so lucky to have the beauty and diversity of art in our world!

For manufacturers, your art can be the key to reaching a new audience, capturing a trend, expressing a sentiment and much more. They depend on you; and you depend on them. So however you create art is fine. It’s great!

What manufacturers want from you, however, has nothing to do with the passion, skills and creative process that it took to design your latest art collection. They are busy analyzing past sales and the newest production processes, while trying to predict the future.

Try to get into the manufacturer’s head. Think about your prospective business partner, the licensee, and give them something to seriously consider. Make sure you offer them a variety of artwork that can be produced with their production process, as well as themes that work for their key sales periods, giving-occasions—such as Christmas and other holidays—and collections that enhance their products’ design. My Manufacturer’s Mindset Class (now available as audio file+full presentation) is a great resource for this, and I taught it with a stationery industry, manufacturing veteran.

Just remember that the number one objective for your art licensing business is to create art that sells products. That is absolutely the only thing that will create income, assuming that making money is part of your definition of a successful business. Now since we all know there are many layers to the feeling of success, creating art that sells also needs to fit with who you are and what you’re all about. And if isn’t in sync on that level, it probably won’t have much appeal to consumers and won’t sell. In that case, it certainly won’t be worth it in the long run. Making money and not being true to yourself is never ultimately successful.

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One response

2 10 2012
Stephey Baker | Maked by the Muse

Creating art that sells is key…I truly resonate with the ability to create art that sells without selling your integrity as a human being and as an artist. This is such an important message. You are spot on in stating the following: “Making money and not being true to yourself is never ultimately successful.” I don’t know about anyone else but if I don’t keep this lesson as RULE #1 then I find I can’t create a sustainable – anything – relationships/business/LIFE! It could just be me and the path that I’m on BUT anything that I create that isn’t built on authenticity has an expiration date. BUT when you finally get that integrity and success are one and the same – that’s what I call wholistic living – living a soul centered life. This is where I find true fulfillment. Thank you so much for opening this important conversation!

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