Art+Design Resource Center, Year 2, and Jill McDonald Design Exhibits for First Time at Licensing Expo

8 06 2015

20150608_174800 (1)The Art+Design Resource Center in Booth C13 will be open for business tomorrow for its second year, as we kick-off the first day of Licensing Expo. There is so much happening at our booth, so here are just some of the resources being offered for Exhibitors and Attendees.

I’ll be posting my blog multiple times a day from the Art+Design Zone of the Licensing Expo. Attendees can view and read the blog on the UBI Advanstar wide-screen monitor in our booth or go online to Licensing Expo’s Show Blog. Included in the blog will be news and interviews with many captivating people from all facets of the industry.

We will be giving away a free ‘Introduction to Art Licensing Essentials – Profits, Promotions and Protection’ class to everyone who visits our booth. This is a comprehensive, nearly 2 hour course, and one of All Art Licensing’s many new, just launched, Worldwide Creators’ Intensive video courses.  We are scheduling appointments for free consultations, as well as helping new and veteran exhibitors in the Art+Design Zone with advice, directions, printing services and a phone charging station. Just as we did last year, manufacturers and retailers can also come and get advice and pointed in the right direction toward creators, artists and designers who will fit their needs.

20150608_174213As I began setting up the Art+Design Resource Center at Licensing Expo today, I was thrilled to see Jill McDonald of Jill McDonald Design is my (across the aisle) neighbor.  Not long ago we met over Skype for what turned out to be a really interesting and fun interview.  I am a big fan of Jill’s art and style, which appeals to kids and especially Moms.Ahoy Ocean

Jill has exhibited at Surtex for 11 years and is now expanding her marketing efforts by exhibiting for the first time at Licensing Expo. This is a longer interview, but it really shows a delightful level of honesty. I know you’ll enjoy learning about her experience with a manufacturer who is doing a line with more than 50 items, her new foray into publishing children’s books and her less-is-more philosophy!

For those of you not attending Licensing Expo this year, let All Art Licensing be your eyes and ears on the show floor, sharing a wealth of information.  Join me.

 

 

Advertisements




Video Interview with Designer Brand – Debra Valencia™ and Beginner’s Art Licensing Essentials Mini-Conference THIS WEEK!

22 03 2015

Debra Valencia LogoLast week was busier than ever with classes coming up and our seven-hour Art Licensing Essentials Mini-Conference for beginners starting this week (click here or see below). But I jumped at the chance to interview Debra Valencia for you…okay for me too! I enjoyed it so much and I know that you will find this wonderful video interview quite informative. We will be doing many more video interviews in the coming months, so watch for them.MiaNotecards

Debra has made a lot of progress in the art licensing arena in only six years of licensing, and in only two of those years did she have an agent. Before she found an agent she realized that getting some deals on her own would help her get a better agent, so she did (OH AROUND!) 32 deals between 2008 and 2013. Debra is also no stranger to helping fellow-artists new to licensing, as she mentors several in her geographic area of Los Angeles.

DVBathBodyI’m so excited to share this interview because it shows that you didn’t have to start 20 years ago in art licensing to become a successful branded artist. I think Debra Valencia is a perfect example for all artists, designers and creators who envision themselves as a brand. The Debra Valencia™ Brand features fashion-forward patterns that have endless applications in stationery, gift, craft and home décor. She is working with manufacturers in paper products, social expression, textiles, home fashions, tabletop, gift, craft and hobby, children’s merchandise and jewelry. Debra’s artwork is currently licensed for over a 1,000 products in stationery, home office, gift and textiles. I’m showing a few lovely products here, but of course, there are many more examples on her web site.

‘Sewing Pretty Bags’ By Debra Valencia & Cheyanne Valencia 132 pages Sewing sisters Debra and Cheyanne present 12 quick and easy projects for sewing boutique handbags, shopping totes, pouches and more. With step-by-step instructions and fresh, modern designs, they show how to make beautiful unique bags for both fashion and functional uses. Featuring quilt fabric collections by Debra Valencia.

‘Sewing Pretty Bags’
By Debra Valencia & Cheyanne Valencia
132 pages
Sewing sisters Debra and Cheyanne present 12 quick and easy projects for sewing boutique handbags, shopping totes, pouches and more. With step-by-step instructions and fresh, modern designs, they show how to make beautiful unique bags for both fashion and functional uses. Featuring quilt fabric collections by Debra Valencia.

Let me also share some exciting NEW news from the Valencia camp: her sister, Cheyanne, and Debra have collaborated to create a sewing book of 12 quick and easy boutique handbags, titled ‘Sewing Pretty Bags.’ She said the concept came out of their sewing handbags and other designer prototypes with her fabulous fabrics, as a way to showcase them. Debra even wrote her own proposal and pitched it at Book Expo, landing a quick deal with Fox Chapel Publishing. The book is scheduled to be in bookstores on May 1st, so look for it.

Okay…that’s all I’ll reveal for now…please make yourself a truly delicious cup of tea in a gorgeous mug or tea-cup and sit back and watch the interview. It will be worth every drop! (We apologize in advance for the slight audio feedback that occassionally arises during the interview.)

WWCI from AALWorldwide Creators’ Intensive – Art Licensing Mini-Conference $125 (Live Events + MP3 Audio Files and Full Presentation in PDFs to review at your convenience) The Worldwide Creators’ Intensive, our first global armchair 3-day mini-conference, is an action packed 7+ hours of learning the licensing business from the comfort of your own home.

Taught by J’net Smith of All Art Licensing – March 25, 26 & 27, 2015

It’s a very well-rounded and comprehensive, intensive 7+ hours of training scheduled over 3 days, with practical and affordable art licensing information created for the domestic and international art communities. The benefit of registering for our live events is that you receive our discounted price and you get to ask questions. If you cannot attend on the day and/or at the time we are offering the courses, don’t worry—you can still ask questions prior to the class and they will be answered.  Then you will receive the full class materials and audio, so you can take the courses at home whenever you like.

  • Art Licensing Essentials (Part 1)
  • Art Licensing Collections & Presentations (Part 2)
  • Art Licensing Marketing & Sales Techniques (Part 3)
  • Art Licensing Negotiations & Contracts (Part 4)

Save when you register for the entire event! Best Price: $125/USD Register for Worldwide Creators’ Intensive – all 4 live events

Learn More by clicking here or I’ve outlined the curriculum below:

WWCI: Art Licensing Essentials (Part 1) Wednesday, March 25, 2015 – 10:00 a.m. PDT / 1:00 p.m. EDT (1.5 hours) $30 (if purchased separately)

This course covers:

  • insights to help you determine where you fit into this business
  • the art licensing process
  • product categories
  • timelines (how long does it take to make money)
  • artist requirements
  • challenges that are to be expected (& pitfalls to avoid)
  • distribution channels and retailers, and
  • the agent/artist relationship.

WWCI: Art Licensing Collections & Presentations (Part 2) Wednesday, March 25 – 1 p.m. EDT / 3 p.m. EDT (2 hours) $50 (if purchased separately)

This course covers how to:

  • develop your marketing strategy
  • define your target audience
  • research manufacturers
  • understand important licensing perspectives (that of the manufacturer/retailer vs. the artist/brand owner)
  • create professional collections
  • develop presentations
  • create pitch letters and
  • organize and write effective websites.

WWCI: Art Licensing Marketing & Sales Techniques (Part 3) Thursday, March 26, 2015 – 10:00 a.m. PDT / 1 p.m. EDT (2 hours) $50 (if purchased separately)

This course will cover how to:

  • create your sales tool kit of essential skills
  • understand the licensing sales process
  • find your retail fit
  • develop sales leads
  • write sales letters
  • communicate with manufacturers and
  • sell yourself to a prospective manufacturer or agent.

WWCI: Art Licensing Negotiations and Contracts (Part 4) Friday, March 27, 2015 – 10:00 a.m. PDT / 1:00 p.m. EDT (2 hours) $50 (if purchased separately)

This course teaches:

  • the essential contract elements
  • protecting the rights to your art and business,
  • generating maximum income,
  • learning industry royalty rates
  • recognizing common mistakes
  • negotiation techniques
  • how to evaluate an offer
  • when to sign a deal and when not to

For more information on the 3-day Mini-Conference Intensives or to purchase any Part separately click here





FYI – Upcoming ‘Live Events’ In March

15 03 2015

Maybe it’s not so easy for you to travel to the latest art or character licensing trade show this year, but you are still really interested in learning about the licensing business and continuing your eWWCI from AALducation and training.

All Art Licensing is offering ‘live events’ beginning March 19th, as part of our Worldwide Creators’ Intensive, that will teach you the Art Licensing Essentials you need to learn with out leaving home, and the first event is FREE.

A Special FREE ‘Ask J’net Q&A’ Dedicated to Answering Your Marketing Questions – Thursday, March 19, 2015 – 10:00 a.m. PST / 1 p.m. EST (1 hour live event)

This Ask J’net Q&A will focus on answering your questions about how to market your art, designs, characters or brand licensing business during this one-hour ‘live’ phone event. Here’s your opportunity to ask questions about creating a marketing plan, trade shows, licensing plan, agents, public relations and more.  What are you wondering about that will help your business grow.

You just sign-up here for the free class. When registering, there is a place at the bottom of the form to write your question(s). J’net will answer as many questions as possible during the hour. All you need to do is call in at the specific time to get answers to your questions and learn from others’ questions. Please note: You will receive your Dial-in number and Access Code for the class the night before the event from All Art Licensing. This is not an 800 number, so your standard long distance rates will apply.

Price: FREE

Register Now

Worldwide Creators’ Intensive – Art Licensing Mini-Conference $125 (Live Events + MP3 Audio Files and Full Presentation in PDFs to review at your convenience) The Worldwide Creators’ Intensive, our first global armchair 3-day mini-conference, is an action packed 7+ hours of learning the licensing business from the comfort of your own home.

Taught by J’net Smith–All Art Licensing
March 25, 26 & 27, 2015

It’s a very well-rounded and comprehensive, intensive 7+ hours of training scheduled over 3 days, with practical and affordable art licensing information created for the domestic and international art communities. The benefit of registering for our live events is that you receive our discounted price and you get to ask questions. If you cannot attend on the day and/or at the time we are offering the courses, don’t worry—you can still ask questions prior to the class and they will be answered.  Then you will receive the full class materials and audio, so you can take the courses at home whenever you like.

  • Art Licensing Essentials (Part 1)
  • Art Licensing Collections & Presentations (Part 2)
  • Art Licensing Marketing & Sales Techniques (Part 3)
  • Art Licensing Negotiations & Contracts (Part 4)

Save when you register for the entire event! Best Price: $125/USD Register for Worldwide Creators’ Intensive – all 4 live events

Learn More by clicking here or I’ve outlined the curriculum below:

WWCI: Art Licensing Essentials (Part 1) Wednesday, March 25, 2015 – 10:00 a.m. PDT / 1:00 p.m. EDT (1.5 hours) $30 (if purchased separately)

This course covers:

  • insights to help you determine where you fit into this business
  • the art licensing process
  • product categories
  • timelines (how long does it take to make money)
  • artist requirements
  • challenges that are to be expected (& pitfalls to avoid)
  • distribution channels and retailers, and
  • the agent/artist relationship.

WWCI: Art Licensing Collections & Presentations (Part 2) Wednesday, March 25 – 1 p.m. EDT / 3 p.m. EDT (2 hours) $50 (if purchased separately)

This course covers how to:

  • develop your marketing strategy
  • define your target audience
  • research manufacturers
  • understand important licensing perspectives (that of the manufacturer/retailer vs. the artist/brand owner)
  • create professional collections
  • develop presentations
  • create pitch letters and
  • organize and write effective websites.

WWCI: Art Licensing Marketing & Sales Techniques (Part 3) Thursday, March 26, 2015 – 10:00 a.m. PDT / 1 p.m. EDT (2 hours) $50 (if purchased separately)

This course will cover how to:

  • create your sales tool kit of essential skills
  • understand the licensing sales process
  • find your retail fit
  • develop sales leads
  • write sales letters
  • communicate with manufacturers and
  • sell yourself to a prospective manufacturer or agent.

WWCI: Art Licensing Negotiations and Contracts (Part 4) Friday, March 27, 2015 – 10:00 a.m. PDT / 1:00 p.m. EDT (2 hours) $50 (if purchased separately)

This course teaches:

  • the essential contract elements
  • protecting the rights to your art and business,
  • generating maximum income,
  • learning industry royalty rates
  • recognizing common mistakes
  • negotiation techniques
  • how to evaluate an offer
  • when to sign a deal and when not to

For more information on the 3-day Mini-Conference Intensives or to purchase any Part separately click here





Heartfelt Art Licensing Lessons- An Interview with Joan Marie

13 02 2015

DotHeartFor my valentine to everyone, I wanted to share this story of Joan Marie, a vivacious artist who is re-launching her art licensing business this year. Having great success early in her licensing career, 20+ years ago, only to have the business plummet, has taught this artist a few heartfelt lessons.

J’net Q: How did you get into the licensing business?
Joan Marie A: Mary Engelbreit inspired me. Watching her business flourish was very exciting. Then I began to see the bigger picture and it really intrigued me.

Q: You have a fine art background, is that right?
A: Yes, my undergraduate degree was from Washington University in St. Louis and my MFA was from both University of South Florida, in Tampa, and Lindenwood University in St. Louis.

Q: How did you get your first deals and what kinds of licensing have you done?Joan Marie
A: I researched companies by going shopping and by attending some national conventions to find the best companies to work with. I wrote down tons of names. Then I would call them to see if they were interested in working with a freelance artist. If they were interested, I sent them a hardcopy of my portfolio with 10-20 images. And I got rejected a lot. When the company that was to be my first licensee called, they first offered me a flat rate. I had been so excited to get their call, then my heart dropped. I told them, I can’t work that way, I must have a royalty. And the manufacturer said they don’t work on a royalty basis. So we both hung up. At the time, I was pretty desperate and I paced and fought myself NOT to call them back. Then he called me back about 4 hours later…and they offered me a royalty. Next I had to create the contract, which I did, through a volunteer organization that offered legal services to ‘starving artists.’ From there I followed the same procedure to get more deals, and really persisted. It took a long time to get going. Then my art sold very well for about 10 years on apparel, stationery, back-to-school and gift items. I had one cat design that sold over 1.5 million t-shirt transfers, which was amazing. And creating 2 lines of collectible plates with The Hamilton Collection was such an exciting time of national recognition. But all of a sudden the public totally stopped buying kittens and unicorns; the market was really saturated with the themes I had painted.bird in flight

Q: What is your favorite part of doing art licensing?
A: Knowing your art can add a smile, some excitement, and warm someone’s heart while using everyday products. It just feels like crazy fun to me. It makes me so happy. I think this is a sign that I am in the right business. “Life is supposed to be FUN!”…and that’s how it feels to be in this industry.

Q: So how has your art changed since those earlier days?
A: My art has covered many styles over the years. Early on I was primarily realistic in my imagery using classic oil techniques. Then I went through a purely abstract phase. Today I combine the ethereal and gently romantic quality of my past realistic art with my new confident intensity. It is very exciting to express so many of life’s emotions in one work of art. My new art is bolder. It captures the high energy passions I see in life.Zebras

Q: What was your biggest hurdle to get where you are today?
A: To stop being concerned about what will sell. Instead to create art that expresses my true vision and passion for life. If your focus is on creating what will sell, you may make a survival income, but you will never discover your unique voice and say something that will truly speak to others. If it doesn’t come from your joy, or your soul, it has no chance to gain a huge following. It is also a challenge to never give up and keep going through the ups and downs in this industry. One of the best words of wisdom I have heard is: “There is a lot of room at the top.” This artist was telling me that very few artists are willing to do what it takes to get to the top, so keep the faith and keep loving the process of getting there.

DoggiesQ: How has the art licensing industry changed since you were in it 20 years ago?
A: Oh wow! BIG changes! Artists were not using computers!!! No Photoshop or email! Can you IMAGINE that??! Finding companies to submit to was so much more challenging…and OH MY!!! I felt so ALONE. We really had nowhere to turn to get help understanding the business! There were NO J’net Smiths at the end of the phone or computer to give us endless valuable information and help!!! All we had was the “Graphic Artists Guild Handbook of Pricing and Ethical Guidelines,” which was and still is really valuable. But that’s it. And mailing hard copies of portfolios was expensive. Then learning how each company wanted their submissions was a much bigger challenge.

Q: What’s the biggest ‘from the trenches’ tip you can offer to newcomers to art licensing?
A: My advice is to learn how to use your strengths and go to others for their strengths to help you get the job done. There are so many more resources available today; it’s such a blessing. So learn who and where those resources are and get out there and use them. I need to focus and not insist on doing everything myself. Read, talk to people and get professional advice. I am thrilled to get assistance on my branding, promotions, publicity, leads and more. We are meant to help each other and not work alone like an island. That’s what I used to do. Secondly, I think you really need to have great passion for this industry, as I’ve mentioned. If that deep drive and excitement or the love of the entire process and of being in business for yourself is not there, then the challenges will surely beat you down. I would also highly recommend having some savings to invest in the start-up of your business. You have to be patient, because it takes a long time for the volume to build up and to make the kind of dollars you want.

Q: In art licensing today, what is your biggest challenge?7WsexhilSM (1)
A: Not to fall into self-doubt or fill my mind with thoughts of feeling stressed…AND to not be concerned about what will sell instead being true to what I am here to express through my art. Gaining wisdom through the years has given me the ability to step out of those old patterns. Now I say: “I believe”…“I trust”… I know in my heart that everything is going perfectly, just as it should. It’s fantastic to feel grounded and excited all at once, knowing that this is what I am here to do.

To see more of Joan Marie’s Art That Celebrates, click here to visit her website.





5 Mistakes that Character Creators Often Make

28 01 2015

Do you have an idea for a new character? Do you think your new character would be an ideal fit for television, books, apps, games, toys or comics? Well, that is a great start. But to fully develop a character that you can sell or license as a larger media property, you’ll need to know that character from the inside out. And you’ll need to be able to communicate the nuances of the character to your audience, quickly and expertly.

If you have created and developed a character and are wanting to build a property, with media and licensing, then consider the following advice. Take these five common mistakes and create your own check-list of things ‘not to do’ when it comes to building your own character or character brand:

1. Create vague characters. This is a no-no. Your characters can’t look like or behave like everyone else’s’ dog, cat or whatever. Your characters need to be distinguishable with specific traits, style, and purpose. Develop the detailed background and dreams for your characters, including answering the questions: who, what, when where, why and how.
2. Think that ‘everyone’ is your target audience. Instead, find a niche audience where you can gain some impact and create impressions before broadening your scope. Try to figure out where your target audience lives, works and plays…and most importantly…how they prefer to get their entertainment and information. Eventually you can adapt your content to expand the audience. But don’t ever think that ‘everyone’ is your target audience.
3. Assume people will immediately ‘get’ your characters the way you do. Don’t be naive. You need to mentally put yourself in your audiences’ chair to adequately understand their perspective. This is a powerful internal tool to develop. You can then create your character’s personality and mannerisms, so your audience can ‘see’ just how funny, ironic, sweet, improbable, dumb, charismatic, sarcastic, ill-at-ease, or whatever your characters really are! It is up to you to develop these traits, as well as create exposure through media, products and other channels.
4. Attend trade shows ill-prepared. Creator’s frequently exhibit at trade shows too early in the development of their characters. In addition, they fail to design the proper materials to actually sell producers, publishers, manufacturers and retailers on doing a deal. Without the right marketing materials and content, these potential partners can’t distribute your characters to their biggest potential audience and help build the brand. Be sure you are ready and get the help you need to do it right.
5. Develop non-sustainable characters. Do your characters appeal to a large target audience, or one at least big enough to support your creations and accomplish your goals? Do they fulfill a long-lasting need in the marketplace, which means they could become ‘evergreen’ characters? Or are they a flash on the horizon of trends? Be careful not to put your time and energy into characters, unless they have the audience potential to match and sustain your ideas and dreams.

Hammy from the 'Over the Hedge' Movie

Hammy from the ‘Over the Hedge’ Movie

All of these mistakes can be avoided with the proper training. I have two excellent classes which elaborate on these specific problems. One class, in which I collaborated with Michael Fry, creator of ‘Over the Hedge’ (DreamWorks) and ‘The Odd Squad –Bully Bait’ (Disney-Hyperion) is called ‘Building Character – How to Cash In On Your Characters Without Losing Your Soul.’

Or you may be planning to attend a trade show and interested in: ‘Marketing Your Art, Characters, Designs and New Brands Through Trade Shows’. Each of these can be purchased and downloaded through our website. The next FREE Ask J’net Q&A is open to everyone who wants to ask questions about characters and character licensing next week, Thursday, February 5th from 12:00-1:00 p.m. PST / 3:00-4:00 p.m. EST. The registration form includes a place at the bottom for your questions, and you will be sent the Dial-In Number and Access Code for the session the evening of February 4th. Register here.





New Year’s Advice for Entrepreneurial Artists and Creators

1 01 2015

With the New Year beginning today, I thought this would be a good time to share some key points I presented at one of the conferences I attended last year. I believe these are important reminders for entrepreneurs with an artistic or creative business.

J'net Smith meets with Zach Hampton creator of College Dayz online comic and Christiana Bleadsoe of G3EK for a mentoring session at the CEO Conference.

J’net Smith meets with Zach Hampton creator of College Dayz online comic and Christiana Bleadsoe of G3EK for a mentoring session at the CEO Conference.

I was honored to speak at the CEO (Collegiate Entrepreneurs’ Organization) Conference in Orlando with other exceptional business owners. I spoke about licensing your concepts, characters and art, and then joined in on a panel, giving our best advice to some very energetic college students about entrepreneurial careers. The CEO Conference was co-hosted by SEA (Self-Employment in the Arts), an outstanding group which focuses on training for college students and those planning to run their own creative business and for whom I am an ‘Ambassador.’

I feel strongly that we need to share our talents and experience with students, young businesspeople, and burgeoning entrepreneurs because while they have more options than ever (a GOOD thing); they also have more options than ever (a TOUGH thing). For certainly, with more options, comes more complexity.

Since it’s part of my job to simplify and make understandable complex business issues, I thoroughly enjoyed being at the CEO Conference. It was a busy event, which made me think a great deal about the days when my career was just beginning to unfold and I had so many important decisions to make. As a young woman, one of these decisions was—‘Do I move to NYC with just a suitcase and a smile?’ I decided ‘yes’ and it was one of the best decisions I ever made.

I had to learn quickly and thoroughly the in’s and out’s of the global licensing arena in order to succeed in developing creative properties in NYC’s corporate environment and then beyond. Here are a few pieces of advice that I know will help many of you starting your own creative businesses:

(L to R) Ed Wimp, Greta Pope, J'net Smith and Mike Veny -   CEO Conference Panel on: Making a Living in the Arts, Sponsored by Self-Employment in the Arts

(L to R) Ed Wimp, Greta Pope, J’net Smith and Mike Veny – CEO Conference Panel: Making a Living in the Arts, Sponsored by Self-Employment in the Arts

1) Run your art business like a business — Some creators think that learning to be an entrepreneur crushes their creativity. Do NOT let this be you! Learn as much as possible, as quickly as possible, about how to make a viable income with your art by creating a viable business. Creating a business is actually much like creating your art. You must envision it, allow it to develop and then do it—bringing it into reality. You need to learn about business models, cash flow, marketing, sales, distribution, strategic alliances, contracts, negotiations, trends and more. You will then be one of the lucky few who actually DOES make a living in a career they love. There is no need to be a starving artist.

2) Find a PROVEN business model — First decide what you want to do and do it! There is nothing as draining as indecision. Find a proven business model that comes closest to what you want your business to be and then follow the example. Whether your creative path is through galleries, art/character licensing, government grants, or something else, you must work within the industries’ parameters and emulate the successful models in order to duplicate their achievements. Once your business is supporting itself, you can then change or expand your business to make things fit you, your dreams and goals more closely.

3) Don’t be afraid of selling yourself & marketing your business — It’s all about finding the right audience for your product (art, characters, designs, skills, services, etc.) and finding ways to profitably get it to the manufacturers, retailers and consumers. If you don’t develop a consistent marketing and sales plan and routine, maintaining it with a strong discipline, you won’t have a business. However, the good news is, if you do develop a serious dedication and continuous motivation, coupled with a strong learning curve and work ethic, you will almost certainly succeed.

4) Do as much as you can on your own — Listen to advice whenever you can. Pay for it if necessary. Attend trade shows, classes, events and conferences with your peers, industry experts and your (B2B and B2C) target audiences, as often as possible. Meet with business associates wherever opportunities present themselves. Then, get as much advice as possible on choosing business partners for all those things you can’t, or don’t want to, do yourself. Remember you have to spend money to make money; but you don’t have to spend a fortune to make a fortune. Learn your strengths and weaknesses, as well as how far you can push yourself. Then build your team by spending your time and energy on your strengths and delegating and investing in those whose strengths are your weaknesses.

I think that continually living outside your comfort zone is exactly why and how growth occurs and is where the brightest and best entrepreneurs are inevitably found. And remember the best advice anyone can ever give you is—‘go for it; you can do it!’

If any of you have questions about art and character licensing, business and brand development, please come and ask your questions during our next free Ask J’net Q&A.

NEW CLASSES FOR 2015 – SIGN UP TODAY
FREE ‘Ask J’net Q&A’
Tuesday, January 6, 2015 – 12 noon – 1 p.m. PDT/3 p.m. – 4 p.m. EDT

Start the New Year off right by getting your art, design and character licensing questions answered by J’net during this free one-hour ‘live’ phone event. You just sign-up here for the class. When registering, there is a place at the bottom of the form to write your questions. J’net will answer as many questions as possible during the hour, all you need to do is call in at the specific time to get the answers to your questions and learn from others’ questions. Please note: You will receive your Dial-in number and Access Code for the class the night before the event from All Art Licensing.

‘Launching and Leveraging Your Annual Marketing Plan’
Tuesday, January 13, 2015 — 12 noon – 1:30 p.m. PDT/3 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. EDT
Price: $60

The New Year is traditionally the perfect time to launch your annual plan. If you don’t already have a plan or need new ideas to increase your licensing sales success in 2015, then I have created this course for you. The class will cover how to develop a marketing calendar for the year, including portfolio development, trade shows, sales timing and techniques, public relations, and social media. You will learn how to organize all of this into a comprehensive plan of action that you can manage and execute to improve your licensing sales results. The major emphasis of the class will be leveraging what you have in your current business to the next, more profitable level. Please note: This is a live audio event, which will also be video recorded. It will include a full PDF presentation booklet, as a part of the course. Any registered attendees who wish to apply to be included in our live stream video beta test, please contact me directly after registering. Included in the purchase price, all registered attendees will receive audio of the class for their personal review.

With the New Year here, it’s such a great time to take inventory of yourself, your habits, your business and goals so you can move to a new level! I look forward to connecting with you in 2015!





Many Characters Start in the Art+Design Zone

17 06 2014
J'net gets reward from her client Scooter of Brokenheart Pet Rescue

J’net gets reward from her client Scooter of Brokenheart Pet Rescue

The diversity of manufacturers walking the show never ceases to amaze me. I have a request from a manufacturer of blankets, towels and other products specifically for western, native american and other types of realistic fine art. If this is a style of art that you do, please contact me by phone or email.

And now for the video blog portion of this post. I had the opportunity to meet with one of my clients today, a multi-talented visual artist who had decided last year came to Licensing Expo for the first time–Daryl Slaton of Tails of Whimsy.

The Mighty Machines of Mackie McKeens

The Mighty Machines of Mackie McKeens

Timree Paint Studio:
Timree Gold is already rich. Her hand painting talent is tremendous. Now she shares her favorite painted designs at the Licensing Expo with examples. “I made product samples in the categories that I feel are the most appropriate for the brand. We’ve got lunch boxes, plates, cell phone cases, stationery and pillows, that are just easy examples of what you can do with the property,” said Gold.

Timree Gold's Art Licensing Collections Shine

Timree Gold’s Art Licensing Collections Shine

 








%d bloggers like this: