20 Important Press Tips for Artists and Creators

15 04 2014

PressreleaseHere are 20 valuable press tips from my recent virtual class, ‘Today’s PR and Promotion Essentials for Art Licensors.’  I enjoyed introducing Greg Walsh of Walsh PR during the course to share his expertise, as well.  The final class included more than 50 important recommendations you can implement yourself, in addition to information on how to determine your press strategy and write your own releases. For information on ordering the class (85+ PowerPoint slides and 2.5 hour audio), click here. I am confident that if you follow these tips, this information will help you get consumer and trade press.

  1. Write and rewrite your press releases to be as concise as possible.
  2. Get clever; there is a lot of clutter out there!
  3. Give the reporter something that they do not already know.
  4. Offer something to get replies (art, samples, interviews) and, always, easy contact information.
  5. Use links as references to back up your news points (use hyperlinks, not full web addresses).
  6. Attribute information, not opinion – its news, not editorial.
  7. If possible, relate to what’s in the news and trending.
  8. If time permits, research your reporter and see what they’ve written about. Then refer to that info in your news pitch – “I saw that you recently covered ComicCon and l liked your article. If you’re continuing to cover art focused news…”
  9. Try not to send too many news announcement or to duplicate information. You’ll be ignored when you do have BIG news.
  10. Create a press list that’s accurate, on target, and not so big that you can’t follow up with it on a regular basis.
  11. It’s better to get consistent press in five to ten publications, than try for 35 and get none.
  12. Once you hone your list and see some results, try to leverage it for something bigger…i.e. start with press releases, and then call the editors to pitch an article.
  13. Always include photos, but no more than three at a time.
  14. When you become a reliable source for an editor, they will certainly call you when they when you are appropriate for an article…now it gets interesting, because you become the resource for the editor.
  15. Call your licensees and see what they are doing…collaborate and combine forces to tap into their resources, rather than duplicate efforts. Ask what they normally do when they get a new license and what they are willing to do for you.
  16. Keep your web site up-to-date at all times, and especially when doing a press push. Editors will very likely check your web site if they have questions on your news release, even before they call you back.newmediamix
  17. Put your phone number and email everywhere; don’t make anyone hunt for it.
  18. Use social networking to find out about new online publications, newsletters, and groups.
  19. Think about non-profits and giving art or something away to gain exposure, increase recognition and help others (and you can write press about it too).
  20. Finally, don’t be intimidated by the press process. Writing press releases is relatively simple and will provide results. If you are reaching out to the editors via press releases, they will become familiar with your work and will eventually it will fit into a story. Editors like to write about everyone rather than a select few artists/companies.

Remember, as you set out to develop a press plan, to include all areas of the ‘New Media Mix’ in your strategy. Public relations can do what advertising can’t, and you will get much more ‘bang for your buck’ by spending time and energy on public relations than through paid advertising. It’s also a terrific way to control your message and build your brand over time.

 

 

 





4 Informational (& Motivational) Online Classes—with Special Guest Speaker

20 03 2014

Many times I have noticed that people (including myself sometimes) say and want to learn and increase their knowledge about a given subject, such as art licensing. Yet often it does not happen. The problem is that often there is no action or follow through to that desire, and therefore, no increased learning or movement forward.

The reason for this, I think, can be lack of continuous motivation. A daily habit of creating a motivation focused on your goals has to be developed. So you will remain motivated until you achieve your desire. This is one of the reasons, I continuously refine and present such detailed classes and blogs, month after month. I want you to succeed!

I have scheduled 4 new classes this spring, including two FREE Q&A’s, as well as two affordable, comprehensive courses.  All classes are designed to inspire and stimulate your desire to succeed in your goals, by providing practical and immediately useful information.

Join our Free Ask J’net Q&A on March 26th and May 14th for some ‘hot’ answers to your most pressing art marketing and licensing questions.

Below is our spring schedule of classes, part of the Worldwide Creators’ Intensive series.

Meanwhile, share this with your friends and colleagues; peruse the courses and register ASAP to get your questions answered!

Ask J’net Q&A’s

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014 – 12 noon to 1 p.m. PST/3 p.m. – 4 p.m. EST

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014 – 12 noon to 1 p.m. PST/3 p.m. – 4 p.m. EST

Price: FREE Register: HERE

These one-hour classes are a ‘live’ phone event, where you provide the questions about art, design & character licensing and J’net provides the answers. When registering online, just write your question at the bottom of the form. J’net will answer as many questions as possible during the hour, all you need to do is call in at the specific time to get answers to your questions and learn from others’ questions.

Please note: You will receive your Dial-in number and Access Code for the class the night before the event from All Art Licensing. This is not an 800 number, so your standard long distance fees will apply.

NEW–Today’s PR and Promotion Essentials for Art Licensors

I’m excited to announce that I will be joined by Guest Presenter, Greg Walsh of Walsh PR, who will discuss Social Media’s role, mistakes to avoid and hot tips and trends in PR today!!

Date: Wednesday April 9, 2014

Time: 12 noon – 2 p.m. PDT/3 p.m. – 5 p.m. EDT

Duration: 2 hours including Q&A

Price: $60 Register: HERE

This class is for the emerging and intermediate level art licensor, those who both have agents and are working solo.  Join me for a comprehensive course that moves you from wondering how to get the word out about your business to managing your own press and promotions (or understanding how to manage your PR agency or agent, if they handle your press).

The class will teach you how to:

·        develop your goals and create your own press plan

·        create targeted press lists

·        write effective press releases

·        build a press kit (and your brand)

·        determine priorities within Social Media, press and promotions

·        PR mistakes to avoid

·        plus 15 HOT press tips to turn up the HEAT!

The goal is for you to understand the PR tactics that will gain you exposure and build your brand and business.  This course will include more than 50 slides with guidelines and visual examples that relate to the licensing industry.

Greg Walsh of Walsh Public Relations, out of Fairfield, CT, will join J’net in presenting a part of this course.  A public relations veteran of 20+ years, Greg has extensive experience in creating PR campaigns through both the consumer and trade media. The brands, properties,and products he has successfully represented include: ZIGGY, U-Haul, Honeywell, The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, National Geographic, Wild Republic Retail Stores, Barbie®, Hot Wheels®, Lalaloopsy, Batman®, Chicken Soup for the Soul®, MTV Game, Slylock Fox & Comics For Kids.

NEW–Character Licensing (Emerging Artist/Beginner Level)–This course has been totally updated and expanded.

Date: Wednesday May 21st, 2014

Time: 12 noon – 2 p.m. PDT/3 p.m. – 5 p.m. EDT

Duration: 2 hours including Q&A

Price: $60 Register: HERE

This course is an introduction to character licensing for cartoonists, animators and illustrators. A lot of creators ask: “What can I do with my characters?” This class will show you some very practical and useful answers to this question.

In this course, we will explore character licensing from the beginning first steps to the first signed contract. This class will teach you how to design characters to enhance their licensing potential, create exposure, leverage business opportunities, know when you are ready to license products and choose the product categories which are best for your characters. We will also cover the most important things to watch for and avoid.

If you are more inclined to create characters, than designs, then this is the right class for you. Your characters make sense to you…now let me help you make sure they will appeal to the broadest possible audience.  With the right industry knowledge and strategic thinking, you can learn how to share them with the world.

Remember, that if you want to attend a class, but have a scheduling conflict, the 2-hour courses always include a PowerPoint presentation & full audio, which will be provided the day after the live event. So sign up, save a few bucks by registering for the live event, but listen to them whenever you like!





An Art Licensor’s Continuing Education

19 03 2014

learn earnThe road to a successful licensing business is paved with many steps over a variety of paths. And it’s not a short journey, by any means. Joan Beiriger, licensed artist and self-proclaimed art licensing junkie (and blogger), was listening to one of my Ask J’net Q&A’s when I mentioned this.

Joan wrote: “One thing that you covered really sparked my interest.  You discussed what the role of an artist is and you said that an artist needs to learn about art licensing not just at the beginning of her career but she needs to continue learning forever.  And that also involves learning about manufacturing and retail to know what consumers want.  Exactly what I believe in!”

I clearly agree with her. She then asked me to write a blog about the education that artists need, to skillfully maneuver the twists and turns on the road through art licensing. Here it is Joan—

In any business endeavor there are lots of things to learn and the world also doesn’t stop for anyone or anything. It does not wait for someone to catch up. Like a real estate agent re-taking their license, a surgeon updating their skills or a computer geek learning the latest software, education and learning is vital and it should be at the top of your ‘to do’ list every year.

As I focused on the various areas that art licensors need to learn about, I thought about how wonderfully diverse this industry is. I personally love that about licensing and marketing, as well. But this does mean that you need to always be open to, and on the lookout for new training opportunities, throughout your career. Here’s my list of topics, which I believe should be on your continuing education list—

ART—As artists, we should explore and expand our style and then experiment with a new one. Never stop seeking more of your creative source. Take time to play with your art and develop your own new ideas and techniques. Also:

  • Keep an eye on current trends, whether for inspiration, or just information
  • If sales are dropping, then consider whether your art style is slipping out of date
  • Make sure you continuously update your web site with new art

TECHNOLOGY—What’s the latest technology on the landscape for:

  • Business, sales & marketing
  • Creating art, presentations, production files and more
  • Communication, social media, publishing & entertainment (Note: they call these platforms, and if you can re-purpose your art and designs for various platforms, all the better!)

LICENSING—What would you like to learn for your licensing business about:

  • Agents
  • Portfolios
  • Collection Design
  • Trends
  • Sales
  • Contracts
  • Negotiations

BUSINESS—What training and skills are necessary for your entrepreneurial business to succeed:

  • Marketing & Sales
  • Branding
  • Public Relations
  • Promotions
  • Accounting
  • Time Management
  • Choose what you want to do yourself and what you want to hire out.
  • Learn how to discern who is the most economical and best fit for your business. That, in itself, is a skill and one in which I often find myself guiding my clients.

MANUFACTURING—What do you understand about manufacturing? Understanding the manufacturing process for different product categories is really important. This is, undoubtedly, one of the biggest areas where I believe artists need to learn more. The art licensing entrepreneur needs to develop skills in:

  • Creating art that works well on products
  • Developing captivating & sales-worthy product designs
  • Tailoring the work you present to a specific manufacturer to fit their production capabilities
  • Preparing art for production
  • Selling (licensing) themselves and their art to manufacturers

RETAIL—In addition to getting inside the head of the manufacturers, retail education is the second-most lacking area in the art licensing entrepreneurial skill set. Artists and all types of creators who want to bring their concepts to market need to learn how to think like a wholesale manufacturer, a retailer and ultimately target the consumer. Therefore, learning about retail is essential and will help you immensely as a licensor when you comprehend:

  • Retailing
    • Channels of distribution
    • Types of retail outlets
    • Pricing strategies
    • Purchasing trends
    • Promotions and new ways of attracting customers
    • Merchandising
      • Visual merchandising
      • Cross merchandising
      • Internet sales

This list certainly doesn’t cover every topic. However, it’s a fantastic place to start. If you really want to create an income with your creations you must keep yourself motivated, stay connected to and expand into your creative source, and continue to learn throughout your career about the industry and business. Never give up on your goals and dreams. Just remember, those that don’t keep up, get left behind.





The Art of Closing the Sale

11 03 2014

NextEven if you haven’t taken a sales training course, you have probably heard the phrase:  ‘Ask for the close.’ I am writing this blog because I believe that in our industry there is sometimes a tendency to forget to close the sale.

Here are a few insights about the licensing sales process which will help you understand when the actual closing or test closing questions should take place.

‘Closing’ means you come to an agreement that a deal will actually be done.  So beginning to ‘close’ the deal is the direct action of specifically asking if you have a deal. There are numerous ways of ‘asking for the close’ and it can often happen several times during the entire sales process.

Examples of closing questions:

  • So, do we have a deal?
  • Are we ready to proceed?
  • Is there anything else you want me to do?
  • Is there anything else you need from me?
  • Can we move to the contract now?
  • Do you want to do a deal?

In art licensing, as in many industries, ‘closing a deal’ begins a progression of steps. It is not a momentary or immediate buy-in.  It starts after your presentation and occurs and re-occurs within the sales process after the manufacturer or other entity shows they have interest.

This is important. Sales is a continuous process.  And ‘closing the deal’ is really a process, as well. You listen and watch the actions and reactions of your prospects, then you test and see where you are in the development of your sale. These are often called ‘trial’ or ‘assumed close’ questions. They are the same ‘closing’ questions, just asked at different times in the sales process.

But if this seems scary or aggressive, just think of it as asking key questions, AND HERE’S THE MOST IMPORTANT POINT, to consistently move things along to the next level EVERY TIME you connect with your prospect or licensee.

I’m breaking this down to something that the most-novice or reluctant salesperson can succeed at.  Every time you have the opportunity to speak with a manufacturer, retailer, agent, or any other potential client, always call them with an objective.  Then, even if you don’t move things as far as you would have liked, know that is was a successful encounter even if you moved forward just one or two steps.

Always think and be clear in your mind about what the next step is.  Then, next time, proceed in the same way to:

  1. Connect with the prospect
  2. Try to move things forward as many steps as possible (without being pushy)
  3. Ask a ‘trial’ or ‘assumed’ closing question, and if it’s not a yes…
  4. Ask what the next step is and proceed as directed.

These small steps are the movements you want, that will eventually lead you to a decision.  Sales is the process of moving an opportunity forward toward your goal and the goal of the other party.  The best deals are ones that are win=win, with something positive in them for everyone!

As you consider what you want and what the other person wants, of course, there will be glitches and compromises along the way. All decisions are a weighing of what you are asked to do, what you are willing to do, and what you are offered for doing it. These are the conditions of the agreement which are negotiated. I find that if you know exactly what you are willing to do, and NOT do, then those decisions should not provide much turmoil.

For example, a manufacturer might say, “I’m interested in your art for greeting cards.” And your assumed close might be: “Is there anything else you need from me before we move to the contract?”

The art licensing sales process definitely has some unique characteristics.

1)      Deal offers often come in small bits and pieces (licensees can/will call or send emails with some of an offer, but not all of it)

2)      You may not know how many other artists are vying for the same opportunity

3)      Frequently, the final decision is made by a group (at the manufacturer/licensee)

4)      You, as the licensor, will rarely be privy to the decision-making discussion

Why are these characteristics important?  Because they suggest a process which you can only influence ‘so much.’  Under these circumstances, the best technique is to gather information, and offer to provide information, samples and assistance, while continually asking ‘trial closing’ questions to see where you stand.

When you do this, you will often be able to move things to another level, step-by-step. The sales process will come to a close at some point, with a cheery ‘yes’ and proceed with negotiations and completion of the contract.  Or it will end with a ‘no,’ in which you need to determine if it’s a firm no and, if possible, why.  Once you understand why, that information can be used to help you in the future.

Those ‘trial closes’ are also a good way to determine if a ‘no’ is firm or not; you want to know for sure if there is some squish room or more simply, any chance they will change their mind.

My final recommendations are to listen a lot, not speak too much and, therefore, ‘talk’ yourself out of a sale. Always be friendly, confident, professional and helpful. Even if you don’t get the sale, with these behaviors, they will be more likely to consider you in the future.

And remember the proper response (in your head) to a firm ‘no’ is: Next!





Protect Your Art With a ‘Shopping Doc’

14 02 2014

red heart sheildMany years ago I remember the first time I heard a manufacturer say, “I’d like to ‘shop’ your art around and see if we can get some interest from retailers.” Since then I’ve heard it 1000′s of times, as it’s become a very common practice in the art licensing industry.

As the economy hit below the belt, manufacturers needed a way to hedge their bets.  They no longer wanted to create volumes of inventory that might not sell quickly. This saves them up-front manufacturing costs, warehousing space, time, and of course, prevents them from having to ‘eat’ the cost of goods that don’t sell.

On the artist side, it poses some problems.  Manufacturers are now asking for high-resolution art to create sophisticated mock-ups, and to often produce a very small quantity of product in order to make their retail presentations.  If the retailer ‘buys in,’ then you could have yourself a licensing deal, but if not, the art is already in the hands of the manufacturer and you have no deal and few recourses to ever get digital art destroyed.

So without so much as an agreement, how can you be sure that manufacturers are not utilizing your exclusive art to sell larger quantities of products?  Well, I think there are many (and mostly) reputable manufacturers, who wouldn’t consider taking your art without paying for it.  But there is always someone willing to take advantage of the situation.  And it would make you would feel very vulnerable to send final art to someone when you don’t have a formal agreement.

With my lawyer, I created what I call a ‘Shopping Doc.’ It’s a short document that I can use when this type of circumstance occurs.  It all boils down to keeping track of what the manufacturer said they will do, and what you said you will do, just as with any contractual arrangement.  This is just a short letter, in which you give the manufacturer permission to ‘Shop’ your art to retailers with specific restrictions. It is very clear, in that, a manufacturer has only the right to shop

a) specific pieces of art,

b) for a certain amount of time, and

c) to listed retailers.

It also specifies that you retain the rights to your art AND it allows you to choose between whether or not you will continue to show the art to other manufacturers, during that same time period.  For the manufacturer, it does not obligate them in any way to concluding a deal with you.  So if things do go well, then you just move to a deal memo or straight to a licensing contract.

I believe that whether you use this form, or make up your own, it’s the best way to keep track of your art and what the manufacturer is doing.  It also gives you a detailed time frame in which to follow-up and determine how things are going and what the next steps should be. I find that, in general, keeping everyone accountable is really important. Also, deals are more likely to get signed.

Feel free to click here and get your copy of my ‘Shop Doc’ and to adapt it to your own situations.  No legal document is fool-proof, but it does help provide guidelines in which the manufacturer has set responsibilities with your art during the ‘shopping’ period. It also gives you the peace of mind that comes with knowing there is an end to their ‘shopping’ process, which would be enforceable in court if required.

I hope it makes your heart feel a bit more protected today, too.





Two Free Spring Classes (and more) from All Art Licensing

13 02 2014

CREATORSLOGO-2_3-smallIs the snow getting you down?  Join our Free Ask J’net Q&A next week and in March for some ‘hot’ answers to your most pressing art marketing and licensing questions. Below is our Spring line-up of classes, part of the Worldwide Creators’ Intensive series.

Next time my blog will focus on ‘Shopping Docs’…something all art licensors and artists should absolutely know about and use…so stay tuned for an information packed blog tomorrow (and a PDF example).

Meanwhile, share this with your friends and colleagues, peruse the courses and register ASAP to get your questions answered in all the classes!

Ask J’net Q&A

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014 – 12 noon to 1 p.m. PST/3 p.m. – 4 p.m. EST

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014 – 12 noon to 1 p.m. PST/3 p.m. – 4 p.m. EST

Price: FREE Register: HERE

This one-hour class is a ‘live’ phone event, where you provide the questions about art, design & character licensing and J’net provides the answers. When registering online, just write your question at the bottom of the form. J’net will answer as many questions as possible during the hour, all you need to do is call in at the specific time to get answers to your questions and learn from others’ questions.

Please note: You will receive your Dial-in number and Access Code for the class the night before the event from All Art Licensing. This is not an 800 number, so your standard long distance fees will apply.

Marketing Your ART, CHARACTERS, DESIGNS and NEW BRANDS Through Trade Shows (Emerging Artist/Beginner Level)

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014—12 noon to 2 p.m. PST/3 p.m.—5 p.m. EST

Price: $60 Register: HERE

This 2-hour course will show you how to market your creativity successfully—whether art, characters, designs or a new brand concept—and enter the $152.2B licensing industry through trade shows and other practical marketing techniques.

This Worldwide Creators’ Intensive, 3-part, class will cover:

Part 1: Licensing and Trade Shows

Part 2: How to Get From ‘Internal Creative Process’ to ‘External Income Generation’

Part 3: How to prepare for and exhibit at a show

Through detailed information and real life examples, J’net will demonstrate clearly how art, designs, characters and new brands are launched into the marketplace. Those who take this course will learn how to determine what they have in terms of a creative product, and whether it could be practical and profitable to exhibit at a trade show.

This class will include a live audio and full PowerPoint presentation. However, if you cannot make the scheduled event time, we will be sending the full class (BOTH the audio and PowerPoint) to all registrants the following day. When you sign up, include any questions you would like answered at the bottom of your registration form and J’net will cover as many as possible during the class.

Please note: You will receive Dial-in number and Access Code for the class the night before the event, as well as a link so you can download the presentation, from All Art Licensing. This is not an 800 number, so your standard long distance fees will apply.

Character Licensing (Emerging Artist/Beginner Level)

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014 – 12 noon to 2 p.m. PST/3 p.m. – 5 p.m. EST

Price: $60 Register: HERE

This course is an introduction to character licensing for cartoonists, animators and illustrators. A lot of creators ask: “What can I do with my characters?” This class will show you some very practical and useful answers to this question. In this course, we will explore character licensing from the beginning first steps to the first signed contract. This class will teach you how to design characters to enhance their licensing potential, create exposure, leverage business opportunities, know when you are ready to license products and choose the product categories which are best for your characters. We will also cover the most important things to watch for and avoid. If you are more inclined to create characters, than designs, then this is the right class for you. Your characters make sense to you…now let me help you make sure they will appeal to the broadest possible audience.  With the right industry knowledge and strategic thinking, you can learn how to share them with the world.

This 2-hour class will include a live audio and full PowerPoint presentation. However, if you cannot make the scheduled event time, we will be sending the full class (BOTH the audio and PowerPoint) to all registrants the following day. When you sign up, include any questions you would like answered at the bottom of your registration form and J’net will cover as many as possible during the class.

Please note: You will receive Dial-in number and Access Code for the class the night before the event, as well as a link so you can download the presentation, from All Art Licensing. This is not an 800 number, so your standard long distance fees will apply.





MAKE 2014 YOUR BEST YEAR EVER — Two-Step Business Plan for 2014

23 01 2014

2014 business plan circleThis is the second part of the ‘Make 2014 Your Best Year Ever’ blog. Don’t worry if you didn’t get organized for 2014 last year, many people didn’t. It’s still January, and the New Year is just getting going; there is still time to establish goals and make plans.

I really like the renewed feeling I get in January and how it helps me frame the various parts of my family, personal and business life. Start by remembering and recapping what you accomplished last year, and envisioning a plan for the coming year. As we discussed yesterday in this blog, think about tackling what you fear most in 2014 to reach new levels in your business.

If you haven’t already taken pen to paper, or keys to doc, then sit down and start writing out exactly what you’d like to grow in your business and what you believe would increase your bottom line the most—or achieve your primary goals the most, whatever they may be.  Keep in mind that what you want to grow in your business may not be what will achieve your primary goals (or vice versa).

Gather up any notes you took about your business or goals in the last year, or even the last 3 years. Find any resemblance of a marketing plan or projections, if you’ve done them. Then clear off a desk or table, and find quiet time to answer these questions:

1)      What were your accomplishments in 2013? Which one makes you feel most satisfied and fulfilled?

2)      What was your plan for 2013? What parts of it got implemented and which parts got overlooked?

3)      What customer in 2013 contributed the most to your gross profit and which contributed most to your net profit?

4)      What unexpected activities affected your business in a positive way and negative way?

5)      What associates (business partners, friends, colleagues) influenced your success the most in 2013?

6)      What activities or people drained your time or energy without producing the results you desired?

7)      What time did you spend on business functions (the daily, weekly and monthly tasks of administrations, bookkeeping, research, managing employees or freelancers, marketing, social networking, PR, etc.,) and how much was spent on sales and creating new art, designs or collections?

8)      What was your bottom line in 2013, compared to 2012 and your plan for 2013?

Now with this under our belt, it’s time for the second step: to create a simple 2014 Business Plan.  Start by reviewing your answers to the questions above—very carefully.

1)      What from 2014 do you want to keep, eliminate, or change based on your year-end results?

2)      What trends do you expect for 2014 that will affect your business negatively and positively?

3)      What do you most want to accomplish in 2014 (increase income, more retail exposure, broader brand awareness, attend trade shows, etc.)?

4)      Who are your competitors and what can you do, and are you willing to do, to distinguish yourself from them?

5)      How do you want to expand in 2014 (sales, profits, employees, art, target audiences)?

6)      What is the biggest fear you can identify which is stopping your business from succeeding and how can you tackle it in 2014?

The answers to these questions can be turned into a simple plan of action.  If it’s over 3 pages long, it’s just too much. So narrow your focus, or wording, and keep it simple. And probably more important than anything is being clear in your heart as to what’s at stake or risk if you achieve or don’t achieve your goals in 2014. Knowing this should then help you find the support you need, within yourself, and with friends and colleagues to actually execute the plan. No one achieves their biggest goals without the right foundation and support, so make sure you attend to those needs early on and throughout this glorious New Year!








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